• Linka Lipski

Clit Revolution: book review

Updated: Jun 15, 2020


I bought this book through the KissKiss BankBank that was set up for the occasion. I have been following clit revolution on Instagram (click here to discover them) for a while now. I can't remember how I discovered them but I recall it started with their first video on youtube. If you speak French, I highly recommend checking out their youtube channel (click here) on sexuality with an emphasis on empowering women.



Tools :

- Winsor & Newton silver calligraphy Paint

- Midori ruler

- Tomboy light pink marker

- Staedtler dark blue fine liner

- Silver pen

- Uni Pin Fineliner 0.3

- Windsor & Newton round brush




This double-page was a simple and long process. To start with, I tried an ultramarine Copic marker on another piece of Leucchturm paper. Verdict? Copic markers and Leuchturrm notebook papers aren't friends: the marker was bleeding through the paper too much and ruining the other side of the paper. The only other blue I have that is closest to the book's beautiful ultramarine blue cover was the Staedtler fine liner. So I settled on the Staedtler, wondering how long it would take me to fill in the whole page.


I decided to colour in my title page with as much blue as possible without having to do the whole page. I started with the space between the letters. Once that was over, I coloured in the space in between words and around to create a full block of colour to replicate the book cover. I took my time and spread the work over a few evenings.





I appreciated colouring in those straight lines. I find the activity soothing. Also, it means that the colouring streaks are unidirectional and minimal and do not highjack the viewer's attention. I find that the finished look gives it a sort of 'static' effect which I quite like.


I then applied the pink marker. I originally chose another one thinking the pink would be the same as the cover but it was too dark. So if you pay attention to the letter C, it is a different shade. That's because I painted it over in white to cover my mistake and then applied my light pink marker. This is why you normally test your colours on a separate piece of paper first. At that moment, I was too confident and impatient and went straight into it. Oh well! Mistakes happens.



Then it was time for the silver. Nothing I own would replicate the mirror shine of that book cover's title. I took the next best thing which was this calligraphy silver paint. After two layers, It was opaque enough to hide the accidental blue smudge on the page. I applied it loosely, not bothering about making perfect edges. The aim was to have the same ragged edges as the letters on the book cover.

Because I am naturally high in conscientiousness, it was difficult for me to be careless in my painting the letters. Even though it was intentional, I constantly wanted to do straight lines or copy perfectly the bumps of the title. Hence, it was a good exercice for me to focus on the feel of the visual ragged edges and not on the execution of them.


In the end, this double-page spread isn't necessarily what I had in mind. The process of making it was relaxing, pleasant and quite fun so I feel rather satisfied with it.

The book :

As the title of the book suggests, this is a manual in how to be an activist for women's rights. Although the emphasis of the book is specifically around women's right, much of the advice can be applied to any activism whether it is for racial rights, LGBTQ+ rights, mental health rights, disability rights and so on.

The manual holds much practical information (e.g. websites, communities, groups) which are specifically for France. However, one can look for the equivalent in their own country and use the information as a template or a foundation to start with.

The book is wonderfully illustrated throughout and extremely well-edited and designed. I read it in one go and I feel very proud about it every time I see it on my bookshelves.


I hope they write a second manual one day which would address how to manage time and money specifically. Overall, I am so proud of these women and the work they do to empower women to continue fighting for our rights. I also felt empowered myself. I feel that I can also participate in my own way. With my smaller actions, I can still contribute to the cause.

The End.

12 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All